Home

Privacy
About Us
Contact Us
Link To Us
Advertise
Personal Injury Blog

IN LAW

Assault & Battery
Bad Faith Insurance
Car Accidents
Clergy Sexual Abuse
Defamation of Character
Definition of Libel
Dog Animal Bites Law
Dram Shop Liability
DUI Laws
Elder Abuse Law
Employment
Enviornmental Law
False Arrest
False Imprisonment
Gender Discrimination
Infliction of Emotional Distress
Invasion of Privacy
Legal Malpractice
Malicious Prosecution
Nursing Home Abuse & Neglect
Personal Injury Advice
Personal Injury Cases
Personal Injury Claims
Personal Injury Compensation
Personal Injury Insurance
Personal Injury Investigations
Personal Injury Lawsuits

Personal Injury Settlements
Police Misconduct
Premises Liability
Recovered Memory
Restorative Justice
Settlement Funding
Sexual Harassment
Slander Laws
Whistleblower Laws
Wrongful Death

Wrongful Termination

OF LAWYERS

Personal Injury Lawyers By State:

AK AL AR AZ CA CO CT DC DE
FL GA HI IA ID IL
IN KS KY LA
MA
MD ME MI MN MO MS MT
NC
ND NE NH NJ NM NV NY
OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN
TX
UT VA VT WA WI WV WY

Personal Injury Lawyers
-
Asbestos
- Car Accident
- Domestic Violence
- Medical Malpractice
- - Birth Injury
- - Brain Injury
- Product Liability

LEGAL TERMS

Legal Terms & Definitions
- Civil Lawsuits
- Class Action
- Compensatory Damages
- Definition of Tort
- Informed Consent
- Intentional Torts
- Loss of Consortium
- Negligence Claims
- Punitive Damages

-Statute of Limitations

OF MED. MALPRACTICE

Medical Malpractice
- Birth Injuries
- Brain Injuries
- Dental Malpractice
- Gastric Bypass Litigation
- Medication Errors
- Psychiatric Malpractice

Of Products ...

Product Liability
- Bextra
- Celebrex
- Mesothelioma
- Ultram
- Vioxx

Medical Injuries ...

Back
Foot
Hand
Knee
Mesothelioma Treatment
Shoulder

Spinal Cord

Specific Injuries ...

Asbestos Dangers
Avoiding

Blast
Boxing

Electrical
Fireworks

Lifting

Personal Safety

PPH
Skateboard
Slip and Fall
Sports

Of Interest

Celebrity Lawsuits
Frivolous Lawsuits
Funny Accidents
Hurricane Katrina
Jessica Lunsford Act
Lawsuit Abuse
Megan's Law
Tort Reform
Weird Accidents

More Info
News
FAQs
Resources

 

 

 

 

 

     
 

PPH Injuries

PPH injuries have been linked to the dietary drug Fen-Phen. PPH (or Primary Pulmonary Hypertension) is a rare and incurable disease.

 

Personal Injury Lawyer Referral
Find a qualified and extremely competent personal injury lawyer in your location.
 

In the case of PPH injuries, blood pressure rises in the pulmonary artery that carries blood from the heart to the lungs and causes severe shortness of breath, fatigue, fainting, palpitations and chest pain.

Injury, including death, can be the result of contracting PPH. Many product liability lawsuits have been filed over PPH injuries.

More About PPH

According to the American Heart Association, PPH "is a rare lung disorder in which the blood pressure in the pulmonary artery rises far above normal levels for no apparent reason. The pulmonary artery is a blood vessel carrying oxygen-poor blood from the right ventricle (one of the heart's pumping chambers) to the lungs. In the lungs, the blood picks up oxygen, then flows to the heart's left side, where the left ventricle pumps it to the rest of the body through the aorta."

The American Heart Association goes onto say, "This abnormally high pressure (pulmonary hypertension) is linked with changes in the small blood vessels in the lungs. These changes increase resistance to blood flowing through the vessels. This increased resistance puts a strain on the right ventricle, which now must work harder than usual to move enough blood through the lungs."

Fen-Phen and PPH

Fen-Phen (fenfluramine and phentermine) was taken off the market on September 15, 1997, when the FDA concluded that its active ingredients such as Redux was associated with extremely high rates of severe illnesses, including PPH. PPH injuries have been associated with Fen-Phen ever since.

Before 1997, the manufacturers of Fen-Phen knew that Fen-Phen:

1. Caused PPH including damage to the valves of the heart
2. Greatly increased the risk on lung disease and fatal heart attack
3. Had never been approved by the FDA for "off-label" use as dietary drugs
4. Had never been tested in combination with each other for safety

What can be done to treat PPH?

First, the symptoms must be noted and PPH must be diagnosed. Symptoms include fatigue, difficulty breathing, dizziness, fainting spells, swelling in the ankles and legs and a bluish tint to the lips, skin and chest. Second, in order to evaluate PPH, the doctor must perform right heart cardiac catheterization whereby a small tube or catheter is inserted into the patient's right ventricle and pulmonary artery in order to measure the pressure produced. From this measurement, the doctor can prescribe the appropriate treatment.

Some of the current treatments for PPH include calcium channel-blocking drugs given orally and Intravenous prostacyclin delivered by a portable infusion pump. Clinical trials are underway to assess the effectiveness of other potential treatments such as the use of Anticoagulants, Diuretics and supplemental oxygen. Heart-lung or lung transplant is acknowledged as the method of last resort for those who don't respond to drug treatment.

Early detection is vital. New drugs and therapies have come on the market recently that can help those with early detection live relatively normal lives. With early detection of PPH, family and friends can be gathered and informed and support groups formed in order to help deal with the illness as effectively and as humanely as possible.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 


 

  COPYRIGHT 2016 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED Major Injury Law